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Knee Scope / Juice

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Hey guys

Saw a surgeon last week and said he’s 90% sure my knee needs a scope done to it.

I’m wondering if theres anything I can take to help get through it for the rugby season thats on now. Its mainly my LCL. I figured EQ and low test e?

Or is there something i can take that will help my recovery be faster? Its either that or hold off until september.

Thanks boys
 
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Check this out and do some digging before you let your doc do this:

(Excerpt from Wikipedia)
But I will back this up with anecdotal evidence from my 65 year old father-no change in pain levels after the surgery.

If it were me I’d be looking at glucosamine and other cartridge support supplements.
To my knowledge there is no steroid that will improve or promote cartridge growth/regrowth.
That being said you could look into telemerase reproduction, hgh therapies or stem cell therapies (probably your best bet) some amazing clinics in Mexico that do knee specific stem cell therapies.

Knee arthroscopy, or arthroscopic knee surgery, is an ineffective surgery that uses arthroscopic surgical techniques. People who undergo this surgery for "wear and tear" joint pain, including osteoarthritis and meniscal tears, usually have high hopes for the results, this is sometimes the case but from one to time the result is no better then before. That said it’s always worth trying and cannot worsen the damage physical therapy.[2][3]

It has, in many cases, replaced the classic open surgery (arthrotomy) that was performed in the past. Arthroscopic knee surgery is one of the most common orthopaedic procedures, performed approximately 2 million times worldwide each year.[2] The procedures are more commonly performed to treat meniscus injury and to perform anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.[4]

While knee arthroscopy is commonly used for partial meniscectomy (trimming a torn meniscus) on middle aged to older adults with knee pain, the claimed positive results seem to lack scientific evidence.[5]

During an average knee arthroscopy, a small fiberoptic camera (the arthroscope) is inserted into the joint through a small incision, about 4 mm (1/8 inch) long. More incisions might be performed in order to visually check other parts of the knee and to insert the miniature instruments that are used to perform surgical procedures.

Osteoarthritis
Edit
The BMJ Rapid Recommendations group makes a strong recommendation against arthroscopy for osteoarthritis on the basis that there is high quality evidence that there is no lasting benefit and less than 15% of people have a small short-term benefit.[6] There are rare but serious adverse effects that can occur, including venous thromboembolism, infections, and nerve damage[6][3] The BMJ Rapid Recommendation includes infographics and shared decision making tools to facilitate a conversation between doctors and patients about the risks and benefits of arthroscopic surgery.[6]

Two major trials of arthroscopic surgery for osteoarthritis of the knee found no benefit for these surgeries.[7][8] Many medical insurance providers are now reluctant to reimburse surgeons and hospitals for what can be considered a procedure which seems to create the risks of surgery with questionable or no demonstrable benefit. However this is still a widely adopted treatment for a range of conditions associated with osteoarthritis, including labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, osteochondritis dissecans.[9]

A 2017 meta-analysis confirmed that there is only a very small and usually unimportant reduction in pain and improvement in function at 3 months (e.g. an average pain reduction of approximately 5 on a scale from 0 to 100).[3] A separate review found that most people would consider a reduction in pain of approximately 12 on the same 0 to 100 scale important—suggesting that for most people, the pain reduction at 3 months is not important.[10] Arthroscopy did not reduce pain or improve function or quality of life at one year.[3] There are important adverse effects.[3]

Meniscal tears
Edit
One of the primary reasons for performing arthroscopies is to repair or trim a painful and torn or damaged meniscus.[11] The technical terms for the surgery is arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM). Arthroscopic surgery, however, does not appear to result in benefits to adults when performed for knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis who have a meniscal tear.[12][3][13] This may be due to the fact that a torn meniscus may often not cause pain and symptoms, which may be caused by the osteoarthritis alone.[14] Some groups have made a strong recommendation against arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in nearly all patients, stating that the only group of patients who may - or may not - benefit are those with a true locked knee.[2] Professional knee societies, however, highlight other symptoms and related factors they believe are important, and continue to support limited use of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in carefully selected patients.[15][16]
 

biguglynewf

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Hey guys

Saw a surgeon last week and said he’s 90% sure my knee needs a scope done to it.

I’m wondering if theres anything I can take to help get through it for the rugby season thats on now. Its mainly my LCL. I figured EQ and low test e?

Or is there something i can take that will help my recovery be faster? Its either that or hold off until september.

Thanks boys
Anything to get through? Depends on the injury. What’s wrong with the LCL? You say mainly.... what else?

What is the doc doing with the scope?

Aas use will speed healing but from my experience rehabbing from quite a few surgeries it’s best not to do much Aas wise.

The problems that I’ve experienced range from too much scar tissue growing to muscles getting too strong too fast... ie faster than connective tissue. Lastly... possible weakness of the connective tissues. I think everyone has seen the study demonstrating the impressive rates of collagen synthesis with Aas use, but also showing the strength of such tissues being weaker or brittle.

Bottom line there’s probably some better options than Aassteicyly speaking. Peptides and growth hormone probably and I’m sure a few others can chime in on some of these newer peps or sarms even that may help with such things.

Balance is the answer.... but Aas although have their place... just be wary of their limitations as well.
 

Goldenrod

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This asks about juice but for what it is worth I’m dealing with a knee issue too and they want to scope it. I’m using bpc 157, TB500, glucosamine/chondroiten/msm, and physio and making improvements albeit slow. I wasn’t making any improvements until I added the two peptides.
Good luck
 

Jdave

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The healing peptides would probably do more than the juice. Some anabolics like deca can mask minor joint aches but coming off is a bitch because not only is the underlying ache there, it was possibly aggravated by continual heavy loading that juicing allowed. And even at that, those are aches not tears or strains (though an ache can easily turn into a strain and then tear if you push it) Are you wanting to sacrifice some joint health for rugby season until you can hold out for surgery? I would not think one season is worth it personally.
Juice doesn’t do what hGH does i don’t think, when it comes to healing ligaments, tendons, and the tissue that cushions joints and sockets . Does anyone know of any anabolic that has healed these issues? I’ve seen the odd thread pop up asking about gear and injuries and im trying to figure out where this logic comes from or if there’s truth behind it. The muscle fibres themselves would heal / recover faster but these aren’t made up of similar tissue.
If anything the muscles going to get stronger than an already weakened joint... possibly making it worse as it pulls at it with greater force. Even non anabolic steroids like cortisone do more to mask pain instead of healing the injury. Im genuinely curious about this and whether or not I’m completely wrong in what I believe
 
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