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RIP, The Canadian Moose, Scott Milne (article)

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RIP, The Canadian Moose, Scott Milne
By Christian Duque, February 6th, 2020




The sport of bodybuilding has lost another great superstar in Canadian IFBB Pro League Pro Scott Milne, who is said to have died of a heart attack. Words like humble, kind, and freak are all used to describe this towering giant who earned his pro card pushing the mass card and going onto the pro stage. While bodybuilding is a sport all about aesthetics, flow, and symmetry, there’s a whole other side to it.

If you want balance, art, and spectacular lines, then you go to Frank Zane, Lee Labrada, Shawn Ray and Flex Wheeler, but if you want freaky size, mass, and that gnarly look, then Scott Milne is one of the names that comes to mind. His entire run was during the Yates/Coleman years. This was a time when guys like Greg Kovacs and Markus Ruhl were roamed the circuit. In fact, they were doing more than just taking the stage, they were taking top honors and winning.

Bodybuilding fans, the press, and even a lot of the judges, really liked size. The top title wad almost like a torch, handed from one massive bodybuilder to the next. And look at the 2002 Night of Champions (the 3rd biggest bodybuilding contest at the time), where you had a jaw-dropping, picture-perfect, aesthetically-pleasing Bob Cicherillo take 2nd to Das Freak, Markus Ruhl. This was the time Scott Milne was active and absolutely no one would be dwarfing him on stage. His physique was so impressive, as was his stage presence, that when he took 2nd at the Canadian Nationals, it was deemed he was worthy of a pro card. That’s almost as big as winning, because earning that rare privilege meant that he was absolutely deserving. It wasn’t by glitch or concession.

We never want to lose our bodybuilding heroes and that’s exactly what they are. You go to any expo, any seminar, any in-store appearance, and you’ll see it, firsthand. Simple weight-training may not be a sport, but bodybuilding is so much more than that. It’s a way of life and it’s helped and saved so many. It’s just very sad to lose someone as special as Scott leave us, at just 46 years of age. That’s the same age we also lost Rich Piana, just a little more than two years ago. It’s so very sad to lose someone this young.

Scott did what he loved; he made his dreams a reality.

Only a select few bodybuilders can make a living in the sport. The vast majority cling to the hope of big prize money and/or landing a huge supplement sponsorship. Now, in Scott’s day, the magazines were in full force, the supplement companies were doing a lot better business, and the industry was very much in a competitive mindset. What I mean by that last point is, that if you were a top guy, it wasn’t entirely unrealistic to make all your money by hitting the stage, doing a few guest posings, and banking on big contracts. This is back when exclusivity contracts were in full swing and you had guys getting checks each month, sometimes doing no work, but taken off the market.

Other guys, people like Scott, really worked hard and found their money even if it wasn’t growing on trees. A lot of our heroes, while very inspiring, aren’t very hard working. Scott may not have been winning the big shows, but once he turned pro, he was always in the industry, doing interviews, making appearances, and doing the business of bodybuilding.


Nothing was going to stop Scott, even a horrific car accident that resulted in a broken neck in three different places. Two years later, after extensive rehab, he was back on stage doing what he loved. That’s what separates normal, everyday people, from bodybuilding heroes. That’s why after 10+ surgeries, the G.O.A.T. 8x Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman talks about doing leg presses, just minutes after surgery, laying in his hospital bed. There’s no question bodybuilding is that powerful and that’s why there’s no question that Scott touched many people with his love of the sport and why his name will forever be remembered. I think that’s very important for the friends and families of our lost heroes to know. They did great things in their lives. They stood for something.

A great way to show respect is to head over to Youtube and watch some of Scott’s videos. I was able to see clips of him competing, a clip of him on a funny movie, and also a really great clip of Scott participating in a tv sporting event. That sporting event is also notable, because he was introduced as being 6’4, 340lbs!! Now, he wasn’t in stage shape, but he was pretty damn ripped and looked very impressive.

It’s one thing to be massive like Big Ramy at 5’10, but to be 280’s (or more) on stage and 340’s in a somewhat clean off-season at 6’4 is even harder. Tall guys have a lot more to fill out and tall guys always tend to look small. Bodybuilding is not a tall man’s sport, but where there’s a will, there’s a way. Scott was never dwarfed – not by height, not by density, and certainly not by spirit!

With regards to the media, I’m very happy to have seen a great report by Rx Muscle. Dave Palumbo did a fantastic job and I’m hoping other publications will do the same during the course of the week. I would also like to see more bodybuilders do something, anything, to mourn the passing. I don’t see nearly as much of that as I’d like. And the effort can be something as simple as an IG story or post, all the way to a small video, in their own words.

In the end, mourning our lost heroes is not only doing right by their friends and families, but also by their fans and the sport in general. Scott was known as being a gentle giant and I think it’s important for our sport to show empathy.
 

Upjohn

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I do remember him , he was one of those muscle tech athletes I think. man shitty shitty , there before the grace of ....
 

Goldenrod

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there seems to be a lot of 40 somethings dying in the body building field. My buddy did after he won the masters and that is just Atlantic.
very unfortunate to loose another person too young.
 

TS1

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there seems to be a lot of 40 somethings dying in the body building field. My buddy did after he won the masters and that is just Atlantic.
very unfortunate to loose another person too young.
yep and at 41.5 I have changed up my dosing and compounds - no more tren, no more orals, sticking to test, deca/npp, EQ, and primo. Sorry about your bud's passing - shitty when someone in the field days, albeit, pro or amateur.
 

Goldenrod

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you may have heard of him - Wade MacIntyre. I am not saying gear had anything to do with his death but he was a beast and ran tren like it was OJ the last I spoke with him. If you google him - there are pics of his winning, selfies and his obit.
Way too young to leave 2 little boys without a dadd.
 

Bigtuna84

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We all know that LVH and Cardiomyopathy is a huge problem in bodybuilding for anyone who uses heavy androgens and GH. You guys have seen it yourself...Dallas’ heart was double the size of normal human beings heart. Sonbaty dead (cardiomyopathy), D’Arrezzo dead (cardiomyopathy) Kovacs dead(cardiomyopathy)...Everyone see where I’m going with this?...
 

manfreakyca

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dallas was on a shit load of gear! if you want to take shit load of gear?? price you will pay!! roelly ramy wonder wat there hearts like!??some these guys!
 

xpac2

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Waited to post here as Scott was a good friend of mine we trained together for 15 years but lost touch when I moved from Scarborough about 10 years ago. Did he do things the healthiest? No he didn't. But I don't give a fuck about that right now. Scott was one of the most down to earth coolest guys you will ever meet. Would always help out and talk to anyone in the gym no matter who they were. Zero ego on this guy and despite his size he was a giant teddy bear. He made mistakes like we all do but I will always remember him as a good friend and a solid bro.
RIP Scott you will be missed
 

methodair

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Without hijacking his thread, and with respect...pathological conditions like coronary artery disease, heart valve dysfunction, arrhythmias etc should obviously be ruled out before pushing the envelope. Dallas inherited severe CAD, Kovacs had mitral valve dysfunction, Nasser was chronically overweight and probably extremely hypertensive. AIs are cardiotoxic. Unlike all the other androgens, testosterone is bioidentical, and often pretty well tolerated by healthy people in moderate doses.
 

Bigtuna84

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dallas was on a shit load of gear! if you want to take shit load of gear?? price you will pay!! roelly ramy wonder wat there hearts like!??some these guys!
There was a huge escalation of dosages from the early 1990’s - 2000’s. This wasn’t a massive problem back in the early 90’s when pros were using a respectable amount of drugs. GH was insanely expensive and most guys couldn’t even afford it. 1997 onward, here comes the internet and access gets widespread, people start using more and more and we see a group of drug junkies flock to the sport and everything becomes doubled and TRIPLED even. Johnny gym goer starts using 6-18ius of GH every day like it’s nothing. The whole sport has gotten way out of control.
 

methodair

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A competitive Polish bodybuilder stated on professionalmuscle.com:

"7-8g when it comes to top pro trainers it is quite standard dosage...to be honest, of course I will not write the name but everyone will know who it is. 5 times the strongest man in the world used 300mg ace train per day and 30iu gh, anadrol in doses of 300mg daily for 9-10 months a year because this was the start season, life is still great and fulfills other sports"

https://www.professionalmuscle.com/forums/index.php?threads/high-anabolic-lower-test-in-offseason.164051/page-3
 
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St

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There was a huge escalation of dosages from the early 1990’s - 2000’s. This wasn’t a massive problem back in the early 90’s when pros were using a respectable amount of drugs. GH was insanely expensive and most guys couldn’t even afford it. 1997 onward, here comes the internet and access gets widespread, people start using more and more and we see a group of drug junkies flock to the sport and everything becomes doubled and TRIPLED even. Johnny gym goer starts using 6-18ius of GH every day like it’s nothing. The whole sport has gotten way out of control.

I started in the later part if the 80's, and the early 90' s were the dose was low to moderate. But your right it did shift in the bad direction.
I was lucky to compete in the 1996 Toronto show were Scott won the overalls. But not in the same weight class
I do remember him guess posing with Mike plats at the ottawa, when I was a judge.
When I talked with him, he was a very nice kind person.
 

Bigtuna84

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I started in the later part if the 80's, and the early 90' s were the dose was low to moderate. But your right it did shift in the bad direction.
I was lucky to compete in the 1996 Toronto show were Scott won the overalls. But not in the same weight class
I do remember him guess posing with Mike plats at the ottawa, when I was a judge.
When I talked with him, he was a very nice kind person.
I knew Mike pretty well. We trained at the same gym. Very sad the direction he took after bodybuilding.
 
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storman

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Always a guy id spend a few mins talking to when we were training at the same time. He also used to bounce at a bar i would go to.
Terrible news and i wish his family the best
 
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