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Steroid Use Cited in Louisiana Murder-Suicide

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~Dr Juice~

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(Getting caught up with interesting AAS related stories that occurred in my absence)





Steroid Use Cited in Louisiana Murder-Suicide
July 24th, 2020




Lauri Bodin alleged that her husband’s violent behavior become worse when he used anabolic steroids.

Lauri Bodin had been in a physically abusive relationship with Trent Bodin for almost 24 years. The relationship had been marred by literally dozens of violent assaults that included verbal abuse of their children, threats involving guns, and death threats.

The relationship ended in a tragic murder-suicide in which Trent Bodin shot and killed Lauri Bodin before turning the gun on himself and taking his own life on July 23, 2020.

Anabolic steroids were never the root cause of the violence inflicted upon Lauri by her husband. However, Trent’s recent steroid use did not help matters.

There is a saying in the bodybuilding community that anabolic steroids do not turn anyone into an asshole. Steroids only turn existing assholes into bigger assholes. This is another way of saying that some people should never used steroids. And this definitely applies to people with a long history of violent behavior and domestic violence.

Lauri Bodin cited her husband’s use of anabolic steroid when she filed a restraining order against him in the summer of 2019. The couple became estranged after Trent Bodin violently assaulted her in July 2019.

Lauri Bodin requested the protective order after Trent Bodin shoved her, hit her in the arms and stomach, destroyed furniture with a baseball bat and fired his handgun six times while she and one of their sons hid in the bathroom.

Lauri Bodin believed Trent Bodin’s recent behavior was “heightened” by his steroid use. She also believed his behavior became worse after he was laid off by BP from his position as a Senior Operations and Maintenance Specialist as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic in March 2020.

Trent Bodin physically abused Lauri Bodin for over 23 years.

However, Trent Bodin’s employment difficulties and steroid use can’t take the blame for his very long history of violence and violence against Lauri Bodin in particular.

In 1997, Trent Bodin was convicted of committing a simple assault against Lauri Bodin stemming from a domestic violence incident following the birth of their daughter.

In 2000, Trent Bodin was charged with second-degree battery of a police officer, disturbing the peace and resisting arrest. The charges were ultimately dismissed.

In 2001, Trent Bodin was charged with disturbing the peace while intoxicated. He pleaded no contest.

In 2015, Trent Bodin was charged with domestic child endangerment and simple assault involving domestic violence. Lauri Bodin suffered a confession and permanent eye damage. She dropped the charges.

In August 2019, Trent Bodin initiated divorce proceedings.

In October 2019, Trent Bodin allegedly threatened Lauri at their son’s football game while other parents watched.

In April 2020, Trent Bodin allegedly threatened to kill Lauri in a murder-suicide.

In May 2020, Lauri Bodin independently filed for divorce citing her husband’s abusiveness and threatening behavior.

In July 2020, Trent Bodin followed through with his threats and murdered Lauri Bodin and killed himself.

Lauri Bodin and Trent Bodin are survived by three children and one grandchild. Two of their children were minors who lived with Lauri Bodin.


Sources: Gagliano, K. (July 24, 2020). Youngsville mom was threatened with murder-suicide before her life was taken. Retrieved from theadvocate.com/acadiana/news/crime_police/article_9c542d7a-ce07-11ea-82b6-3758e39f1c98.html
 

Hussell

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Very sad for the children I hope they get the help they need to get through year's of seeing that abuse and then finally losing their parents.

I did alot of research before I jumped on gear for the first time because you always heard those stories about quote on quote roid rage and I remember watching a video by Pete Rubish I believe and those were his excat words if your already an asshole chances are your going to be an even bigger asshole, I can honestly say I've had no issues except when I was on Tren where I had anger issues on tren which I could sense.
 
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~Dr Juice~

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-- It's interesting to note that Canada is currently in the process of passing a bill (I believe it's called Clare's Law) that will help battle domestic violence by allowing police to intervene BEFORE a possible act of violence is evoked. As it stands right now police can only intervene after the fact, which is obviously terrible and has led to countless acts of violence brought upon a whole range of victims. The bill's case was helped by a recent incident in which a husband removed the tires of his wife's car so she couldn't flee or seek help. They lived in a remote locale so you can see the obvious harm in allowing that to perpetuate and possibly escalate. She was basically a prisoner of his bullish and outright violent whims. Perhaps in the case of this American event police could have intervened at a much sooner time and made the prosecutions or take steps to allow the woman and children a better outcome?


Wikipedia
Clare's Law
, often known officially as a Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme or similar, designates several ways for police officers to disclose a person's history of abusive behavior to those who be at risk from such behavior. It is intended to reduce intimate partner violence. Clare's Law is named for Clare Wood, a woman murdered in England by a former domestic partner who police knew to be dangerous.

Clare's Law has two main elements: a 'right to ask', which allows members of the public, including a domestic partner, to request information from the police about a potential abuser; and a 'right to know', which, in certain circumstances, permits police to disclose such information to the public on their own initiative.

First implemented in England and Wales in 2014, the policy structure has since been adopted or proposed in various forms elsewhere in the United Kingdom as well as in Australia and Canada. Despite its name, Clare's Law need not—and often does not—take the form of a statute. Instead, it may be implemented as a policy document or guidance issued by a government authority to police departments.[a]
 
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Old RhynoS

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-- It's interesting to note that Canada is currently in the process of passing a bill that will help battle domestic violence by allowing police to intervene BEFORE a possible act of violence is evoked. As it stands right now police can only intervene after the fact, which is obviously terrible and has led to countless acts of violence brought upon a whole range of victims. The bill's case was helped by a recent incident in which a husband removed the tires of his wife's car so she couldn't flee or seek help. They lived in a remote locale so you can see the obvious harm in allowing that to perpetuate and possibly escalate. She was basically a prisoner of his bullish and outright violent whims. Perhaps in the case of this American event police could have intervened at a much sooner time and made the prosecutions or take steps to allow the woman and children a better outcome?
I wonder what the guidelines will be for deciding the when and/or why or if it will be a blanket law they can use to enter houses " under suspicion".
 
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~Dr Juice~

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I wonder what the guidelines will be for deciding the when and/or why or if it will be a blanket law they can use to enter houses " under suspicion".
-- I just edited my post to include the language presented in the bill. It appears to be an applicant based approach in which details can then be disclosed. And in some cases the police themselves can choose to disclose information if they deem a situation demands.
 

Old RhynoS

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-- I just edited my post to include the language presented in the bill. It appears to be an applicant based approach in which details can then be disclosed. And in some cases the police themselves can choose to disclose information if they deem a situation demands.
Oh that makes much more sense. Hopefully it becomes well known and anyone in new relationships take advantage of it. Unfortunately the abuse doesn't usually show itself untill the partner is involved.
Even better if the police can monitor potential threats and warn potential suitors.
This is a law I can fully support.
 

Justpicaname5

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Domestic violence is an issue I take to heart. I have a family member that lived through a very abusive situation.
It isn't easy. She ended up feeling trapped, scared for her life. Even like she was at fault.
She had moved away. None of our family was aware or could see any signs because the distance she was living.
She never reached out for help or told any of us.
She finally ended up leaving the guy.. and he, still was only a year or so later she told any of us about what had happened.
Of course the guy was long gone... probably lucky for him.. and me!

Anyways a law that can help police intervene when the blatantly see an issue is a great thing.
But with these type of laws we have to be careful it is not taken advantage of and misused.
We don't want our rights taken away.

But no woman or child, hell even man, should ever have to suffer through domestic abuse! Period!
 

Zuespas

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At least the children are safe now. I knew a girl who ultimately took her own life that was a victim of extreme abuse from her father. He died while she was still with us and I’ve never seen someone so relieved to see someone go. It’s sad the mother was a victim here but it looks like all are better off without that man around.
 

Harley00

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-- It's interesting to note that Canada is currently in the process of passing a bill (I believe it's called Clare's Law) that will help battle domestic violence by allowing police to intervene BEFORE a possible act of violence is evoked. As it stands right now police can only intervene after the fact, which is obviously terrible and has led to countless acts of violence brought upon a whole range of victims. The bill's case was helped by a recent incident in which a husband removed the tires of his wife's car so she couldn't flee or seek help. They lived in a remote locale so you can see the obvious harm in allowing that to perpetuate and possibly escalate. She was basically a prisoner of his bullish and outright violent whims. Perhaps in the case of this American event police could have intervened at a much sooner time and made the prosecutions or take steps to allow the woman and children a better outcome?


Wikipedia
Clare's Law
, often known officially as a Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme or similar, designates several ways for police officers to disclose a person's history of abusive behavior to those who be at risk from such behavior. It is intended to reduce intimate partner violence. Clare's Law is named for Clare Wood, a woman murdered in England by a former domestic partner who police knew to be dangerous.

Clare's Law has two main elements: a 'right to ask', which allows members of the public, including a domestic partner, to request information from the police about a potential abuser; and a 'right to know', which, in certain circumstances, permits police to disclose such information to the public on their own initiative.

First implemented in England and Wales in 2014, the policy structure has since been adopted or proposed in various forms elsewhere in the United Kingdom as well as in Australia and Canada. Despite its name, Clare's Law need not—and often does not—take the form of a statute. Instead, it may be implemented as a policy document or guidance issued by a government authority to police departments.[a]
This is a great post sir. Good read.
 
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