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Volume and Total Volume

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Been seeing a lot of discussions basically all boiling down to volume. So I felt that another excerpt from the book could be useful..


Many training templates, whether in the niche of powerlifting or bodybuilding or even cross training for this matter, will concentrate on gradually augmenting volume over a given time frame. One program will have you adding weights each workout or each week, for example, while another will have you adding exercises and/or sets. Both of these are essentially adding volume on muscle groups. This is why, when we calculate volume and total volume (TV), we are in a better position to understand where we currently stand in terms of training, or fitness.

If your body part(s) are stagnating and you are positive it is not an energy intake (or expenditure) issue, then bumping up volume is the next step. Doing so blindly could be good, it could also be disastrous. Too big of a bump will most likely lead to a strain or more serious injury after a few weeks. On the other hand, too small of a bump and you will end up with no results.

This is how you calculate volume:

Deadlifts- 3 sets on Monday, 140lbs set 1 for 15 repetitions (reps); 225lbs set 2 for 12 reps; 315lbs set 3 for 8 reps
V= (140*15) + (225*12) + (315*8) =7320 lbs
Therefore, a simplified and general formula for volume is:
V= (weight used * reps completed) * sets completed
The simple difference between volume (V) and TV is that TV is V over a week. If you would not have done any more deadlifts for this week V=TV.


CJMers: What I personally do is track everything on excel. I like to geek out on graphs and charts too when I have 2 free minutes but this is just me. The tracking is the essential part IMO.

Different rep ranges can also work the body differently but as this is a bodybuilding forum we pretty much all know the usual rep range used for not endurance training.
 
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Testbear

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i think this can be misleading..calculating warm up sets into your total volume since the 135, 225 are proving basically no growth stimulus.
for example i was at the gym yesterday doing close grip bench press, worked up to a heavy set of 3 backed off to a 6 then 10. while the guy next to me had 12 inch arms and i kid you not was doing triceps extensions for probably 20 sets. spent about 45 minutes doing rope pushdowns with a bullshit weight..

sure he did more 'volume' the workload was probably 5x what i did..but did it induce more growth? fuck no..
i only track volume at weights 70% or higher and for sets atleast an rpe 7-8 ..otherwise everything else is negligible

most of you guys already know this, this is just for the newbies
 
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i think this can be misleading..calculating warm up sets into your total volume since the 135, 225 are proving basically no growth stimulus.
for example i was at the gym yesterday doing close grip bench press, worked up to a heavy set of 3 backed off to a 6 then 10. while the guy next to me had 12 inch arms and i kid you not was doing triceps extensions for probably 20 sets. spent about 45 minutes doing rope pushdowns with a bullshit weight..

sure he did more 'volume' the workload was probably 5x what i did..but did it induce more growth? fuck no..
i only track volume at weights 70% or higher and for sets atleast an rpe 7-8 ..otherwise everything else is negligible

most of you guys already know this, this is just for the newbies
It depends on the individuals too. Some guys need 50k lbs squat TV to get a better squat, some need 100k.

Calculating warmup sets is what I would suggest after being consistent with any type of tracking. If you only have ever tracked this way, then you'll be fine.

For growth inducing, which I don't get into here, there are many things to take into account like failure, hormones, and even mind-muscle connection as weird as it sounds. (Intent)

This is more of the baseline things one should be doing IMO to be able to coach themselves. Also, works awesome for improving lifts and switching up splits/frequency.
 

Testbear

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It depends on the individuals too. Some guys need 50k lbs squat TV to get a better squat, some need 100k.

Calculating warmup sets is what I would suggest after being consistent with any type of tracking. If you only have ever tracked this way, then you'll be fine.

For growth inducing, which I don't get into here, there are many things to take into account like failure, hormones, and even mind-muscle connection as weird as it sounds. (Intent)

This is more of the baseline things one should be doing IMO to be able to coach themselves. Also, works awesome for improving lifts and switching up splits/frequency.
True enough. Sometimes different philosophies produce the same end result
 
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I have often been told I was doing too much (years ago, not now). Volume was too high (number of sets and reps and also number of exercises per muscle). Not sure what too much is considering I used slightly lighter weights than the guys I was working out with. I never counted the warm up set as part of the total volume since it was just that, a warm up set that would allow me to lift/push more afterwards.

I have tried different training methods since I started lifting (DC training being one of them).
 
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I have often been told I was doing too much (years ago, not now). Volume was too high (number of sets and reps and also number of exercises per muscle). Not sure what too much is considering I used slightly lighter weights than the guys I was working out with. I never counted the warm up set as part of the total volume since it was just that, a warm up set that would allow me to lift/push more afterwards.

I have tried different training methods since I started lifting (DC training being one of them).
I think knowing your TV each week is super useful. Of course there is technique to take into account as well and intensity.. But you can actually maintain on the same volume even if that volume is just "warmup sets".

7320lbs was the example used. The "warmup set", I guess was the "pussy" weight (lol) of 140. So this TV divided by only warmup weight gives us (7320/140) 53 reps. I can pretty much guarantee that (again, all other things being equal) if one does this same TV with only "warmup sets" they will not LOSE deadlift strength. The goal of this thread wasn't on how to make gains or grow, but to know where you stand.
 
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